Saturday, October 31, 2015


天主 2 現代文

Bonazzi AndreaさんがDropboxで1件のファイルを共有しました 省略




天主 1 漢文


Thursday, October 15, 2015

John Henry Newman
Sermon 1. Holiness Necessary for Future Blessedness 
"Holiness, without which no man shall see the Lord." Hebrews xii. 14.

Nay, I will venture to say more than this;—it is fearful, but it is right to say it;—that if we wished to imagine a punishment for an unholy, reprobate soul, we perhaps could not fancy a greater than to summon it to heaven. Heaven would be hell to an irreligious man. We know how unhappy we are apt to feel at present, when alone in the midst of strangers, or of men of different tastes and habits from ourselves. How miserable, for example, would it be to have to live in a foreign land, among a people whose faces we never saw before, and whose language we could not learn. And this is but a faint illustration of the loneliness of a man of earthly dispositions and tastes, thrust into the society of saints and angels. How forlorn would he wander through the courts of heaven! He would find no one like himself; he would see in every direction the marks {8} of God's holiness, and these would make him shudder. He would feel himself always in His presence. He could no longer turn his thoughts another way, as he does now, when conscience reproaches him. He would know that the Eternal Eye was ever upon him; and that Eye of holiness, which is joy and life to holy creatures, would seem to him an Eye of wrath and punishment. God cannot change His nature. Holy He must ever be. But while He is holy, no unholy soul can be happy in heaven. Fire does not inflame iron, but it inflames straw. It would cease to be fire if it did not. And so heaven itself would be fire to those, who would fain escape across the great gulf from the torments of hell. The finger of Lazarus would but increase their thirst. The very "heaven that is over their head" will be "brass" to them.

Thursday, October 08, 2015

一万の難点は一疑問にもならない  J. H. Newman

Blessed John Henry Newman wrote, "Ten thousand difficulties do not make one doubt." What he means is that there is a difference between a doubt and a difficulty. When we start to think through our Catholic faith we would be negligent or stupid not to have some problems. After all, the things we propose as true in the Catholic faith stretch the human mind and heart.

However, many people are worried that they are doubting their faith if they scratch their heads puzzled over our beliefs.

There is a difference between doubt and difficulty. The person with a difficulty says, "How can that be so?" whereas a person who doubts says, "That can't be so!"

The first statement expresses difficulty, but willingness to believe. The second statement expresses cynicism and unwillingness to submit to the Church's teachings. The person with difficulties says, "I believe, Lord; help my unbelief!" The person with doubts says, "I don't believe Lord, and don't bother to help my unbelief!"